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Design Made in Carrara Sustainable

Loos, the Carrara marble vase celebrating recycling and minimalism

August 5, 2019
LOOS vase in white Carrara marble and Black Marquina marble by Giorgio Gaudio

We present you Loos, the vase in White Carrara Marble and Black Marquina designed by Giorgio Gaudio. This vase, a unique piece of handicraft made in Carrara, is named after Adolf Loos, the great Austrian architect who imposed himself against the impractical decoration of secessionism, and it inspired to the house Loos designed for Josephine Baker.

It is not the first time that we see a black and white marble contrasting play, but what we like about this vase is the extreme and sincere recycling project behind it.

Giorgio Gaudio is a young Italian designer to watch (follow him on instagram @gigaudio), graduated at IAAD Turin, winner of the A’ Design Award in Social Design Category. His works range from industrial design to UX and UI design, and  when he moved from Turin to Carrara in Tuscany, he was so fascinated by marble that could not help starting designing for this material too.

 

How was Loos project born, and does it have a development?

‘I wanted to create an object using marble scraps, with a relatively low cost in terms of time and feasibility. From some abandoned scraps of white Carrara marble and Black Marquina, baked by the sun, we have obtained small tiles, then they have been glued together and turned in a lathe, to show their best side. It is a simple object, the material itself creates it.

I would like to create a line that celebrates recycling, minimalism.’

 

How did Carrara inspire this project?

From the house where I live, in this city that does not belong to me, you can see the most famous quarries in the world, those of Michelangelo and Canova. When enlightened at night, the Carrara marble quarries, possess a cold and grandiose beauty which is impossible to forget.
Marble is a difficult material.
Wonder and death coexist in marble, throughout its history: the perfect faces of emperors and gods are drenched with the blood of the miners.
Marble is a hard and strong material, like the hands of those who work it.
LOOS is a vase produced with waste materials, which have been given a new life.
It is a choice of tenacity and revenge.
It is a tribute to the ancientness of this place, that has been able to welcome me and become home.

 

Circular design we like

Everything Marble promotes Carrara marble sustainable design. We collaborate with local crafters to produce marble / marble-inspired sustainable products. The percentage of Carrara marble ‘waste’ from extraction and industrial production is still very high in some cases. At the same time, we honestly think this precious material should not be used for everything (some marble objects just do not make sense ).

That’s why, among thousands of marble objects being produced nowadays, we carefully select those designed with Circular Economy in mind.

This is the case of LOOS.

 

The house designed for Josephine Baker by Adolf Loos

The house designed for Josephine Baker by Adolf Loos

LOOS vase in white Carrara marble and Black Marquina marble by Giorgio Gaudio

LOOS vase in white Carrara marble and Black Marquina marble by Giorgio Gaudio – Giulia Lorenzetto ph

 

LOOS vase in white Carrara marble and Black Marquina marble by Giorgio Gaudio

LOOS vase in white Carrara marble and Black Marquina marble by Giorgio Gaudio

 

 

LOOS vase in white Carrara marble and Black Marquina marble by Giorgio Gaudio

LOOS vase in white Carrara marble and Black Marquina marble by Giorgio Gaudio

LOOS vase in white Carrara marble and Black Marquina marble by Giorgio Gaudio

LOOS vase in white Carrara marble and Black Marquina marble by Giorgio Gaudio

LOOS vase in white Carrara marble and Black Marquina marble by Giorgio Gaudio

LOOS vase in white Carrara marble and Black Marquina marble by Giorgio Gaudio –  Giulia Lorenzetto ph

 

Loos
  • Measures: 22 x 15  x 15 cm
  • Weight: 6 Kg
  • Materials: Carrara marble and Nero Marquina marble
  • Designer: Giorgio Gaudio
  • Pictures by Giulia Lorenzetto ph